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| othernames = Cort Theatre

| othernames = Cort Theatre

| production =

| production =

| currentuse = Closed for renovation

| currentuse = Closed for renovation

| website = {{URL|https://shubert.nyc/theatres/cort/}}

| website = {{URL|https://shubert.nyc/theatres/cort/}}

| embedded = {{Infobox historic site

| embedded = {{Infobox historic site

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==Design==

==Design==

The James Earl Jones Theatre, designed by [[Thomas W. Lamb]] in the [[Neoclassical architecture|neoclassical style]] for impresario [[John Cort (impresario)|John Cort]], was constructed in 1912.<ref name=”NYCL p. 8″>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|1987|ps=.|p=8}}</ref> The venue is one of Lamb’s few remaining theater buildings.<ref>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|1987|ps=.|p=10}}</ref> Although Edward B. Corey was frequently credited as the architect,<ref name=”Bordman 1987 p. 150″>{{cite book |last=Bordman |first=G.M. |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=DiI1wIyatvUC&pg=PA150 |title=The Concise Oxford Companion to American Theatre |publisher=Oxford University Press |year=1987 |isbn=978-0-19-516986-7 |page=150 |access-date=2021-11-16 |archive-date=2021-11-16 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211116142040/https://books.google.com/books?id=DiI1wIyatvUC&pg=PA150 |url-status=live}}</ref><ref name=”BM p. 57″ /> Lamb was the [[architect of record]].<ref name=”NYCL p. 12″>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior|1987|ps=.|p=12}}</ref> and William Crawford was the general contractor for the project.<ref>{{cite magazine |date=June 15, 1912 |title=Theatres |url=https://rerecord.library.columbia.edu/document.php?vol=ldpd_7031148_049&page=ldpd_7031148_049_00001685&no=1 |journal=The Real Estate Record: Real estate record and builders’ guide |volume=89 |pages=1309 |via=[[Columbia University|columbia.edu]] |number=2309 |access-date=November 16, 2021 |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111175700/https://rerecord.library.columbia.edu/document.php?vol=ldpd_7031148_049&page=ldpd_7031148_049_00001685&no=1 |url-status=live}}</ref> An annex directly to the west {{show by date|2022|12|31|is being|was}} designed by [[Kostow Greenwood Architects]] and is being built between 2021 and 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″ />

The James Earl Jones Theatre, designed by [[Thomas W. Lamb]] in the [[Neoclassical architecture|neoclassical style]] for impresario [[John Cort (impresario)|John Cort]], was constructed in 1912.<ref name=”NYCL p. 8″>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|1987|ps=.|p=8}}</ref> The venue is one of Lamb’s few remaining theater buildings.<ref>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission|1987|ps=.|p=10}}</ref> Although Edward B. Corey was frequently credited as the architect,<ref name=”Bordman 1987 p. 150″>{{cite book |last=Bordman |first=G.M. |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=DiI1wIyatvUC&pg=PA150 |title=The Concise Oxford Companion to American Theatre |publisher=Oxford University Press |year=1987 |isbn=978-0-19-516986-7 |page=150 |access-date=2021-11-16 |archive-date=2021-11-16 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211116142040/https://books.google.com/books?id=DiI1wIyatvUC&pg=PA150 |url-status=live}}</ref><ref name=”BM p. 57″ /> Lamb was the [[architect of record]].<ref name=”NYCL p. 12″>{{harvnb|Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior|1987|ps=.|p=12}}</ref> and William Crawford was the general contractor for the project.<ref>{{cite magazine |date=June 15, 1912 |title=Theatres |url=https://rerecord.library.columbia.edu/document.php?vol=ldpd_7031148_049&page=ldpd_7031148_049_00001685&no=1 |journal=The Real Estate Record: Real estate record and builders’ guide |volume=89 |pages=1309 |via=[[Columbia University|columbia.edu]] |number=2309 |access-date=November 16, 2021 |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111175700/https://rerecord.library.columbia.edu/document.php?vol=ldpd_7031148_049&page=ldpd_7031148_049_00001685&no=1 |url-status=live}}</ref> An annex directly to the west {{show by date|2022|||is being|was}} designed by [[Kostow Greenwood Architects]] and is being built between 2021 and 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″ />

=== Facade ===

=== Facade ===

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==== Annex ====

==== Annex ====

[[File:W_48_St_Nov_2021_04.jpg|thumb|The theater under renovation in November 2021, with the annex being constructed at right]] [[File:W_48_St_Nov_2021_04.jpg|thumb|The theater under renovation in November 2021, with the annex being constructed at right]]

The western annex, measuring {{Convert|35|ft}} wide, is being built between 2021 and 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″ /> The annex {{show by date|2022|12|31|will be|is}} about {{Convert|74|ft}} tall, with five stories; the elevator shaft in the annex {{show by date|2022|12|31|will rise|rises}} to {{Convert|80|ft}}. A recessed brown-granite bay at the end of the alley {{show by date|2022|12|31|will connect|connects}} the annex and original theater.<ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=88|ps=.}}</ref> The annex’s elevator shaft {{show by date|2022|12|31|will be|is}} about 30 feet above the roof of the original theater.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 89″>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=89|ps=.}}</ref> Unlike the original facade, it {{show by date|2022|12|31|will have|has}} a modern design with cream-colored terracotta facade panels interspersed with polished brownstone pieces.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 71″ /><ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″>{{cite web |last=Nelson |first=Andrew |date=November 28, 2017 |title=Renderings Revealed for Cort Theater Expansion at 138 West 48th Street, Times Square |url=https://newyorkyimby.com/2017/11/renderings-revealed-for-cort-theater-expansion-at-138-west-48th-street-times-square.html |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=New York YIMBY |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193225/https://newyorkyimby.com/2017/11/renderings-revealed-for-cort-theater-expansion-at-138-west-48th-street-times-square.html |url-status=live}}</ref> There {{show by date|2022|12|31|will be|are}} glass display boxes at ground level, as well as a glazed window at the eastern corner of the annex’s upper stories.<ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|pp=88–89|ps=.}}</ref> There {{show by date|2022|12|31|will also be|is also}} an [[LED]] sign on the exterior of the annex’s upper stories.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 89″ /><ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ />

The western annex, measuring {{Convert|35|ft}} wide, is being built between 2021 and 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″ /> The annex {{show by date|2022|||will be|is}} about {{Convert|74|ft}} tall, with five stories; the elevator shaft in the annex {{show by date|2022|||will rise|rises}} to {{Convert|80|ft}}. A recessed brown-granite bay at the end of the alley {{show by date|2022|||will connect|connects}} the annex and original theater.<ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=88|ps=.}}</ref> The annex’s elevator shaft {{show by date|2022|||will be|is}} about 30 feet above the roof of the original theater.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 89″>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=89|ps=.}}</ref> Unlike the original facade, it {{show by date|2022|||will have|has}} a modern design with cream-colored terracotta facade panels interspersed with polished brownstone pieces.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 71″ /><ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″>{{cite web |last=Nelson |first=Andrew |date=November 28, 2017 |title=Renderings Revealed for Cort Theater Expansion at 138 West 48th Street, Times Square |url=https://newyorkyimby.com/2017/11/renderings-revealed-for-cort-theater-expansion-at-138-west-48th-street-times-square.html |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=New York YIMBY |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193225/https://newyorkyimby.com/2017/11/renderings-revealed-for-cort-theater-expansion-at-138-west-48th-street-times-square.html |url-status=live}}</ref> There {{show by date|2022|||will be|are}} glass display boxes at ground level, as well as a glazed window at the eastern corner of the annex’s upper stories.<ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|pp=88–89|ps=.}}</ref> There {{show by date|2022|||will also be|is also}} an [[LED]] sign on the exterior of the annex’s upper stories.<ref name=”AKRF Inc. p. 89″ /><ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ />

=== Interior ===

=== Interior ===

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==== Annex ====

==== Annex ====

The Jones’s annex {{show by date|2022|12|31|will contain|contains}} a [[superstructure]] of concrete and {{show by date|2022|12|31|will cover|covers}} {{Convert|20000|ft2}}.<ref>{{cite web |date=April 7, 2021 |title=Cort Theatre |url=https://www.jrmcm.com/project/cort-theatre/ |access-date=November 12, 2021 |website=JRMCM |archive-date=November 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211112142955/https://www.jrmcm.com/project/cort-theatre/ |url-status=live}}</ref> The annex {{show by date|2022|12|31|will have|has}} accessible bathrooms, concession areas, lounge, dressing rooms, and rehearsal space. A grand staircase {{show by date|2022|12|31|will connect|connects}} the lounges on three stories of the annex, with views of 48th Street. An elevator is being placed in the annex to allow wheelchair access into the auditorium’s balconies.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /> The annex {{show by date|2022|12|31|will be|is}} connected to the existing theater via new door openings.<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ /><ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=72|ps=.}}</ref> With the construction of the annex, the [[Wing (theater)|wings]] beside the stage {{show by date|2022|12|31|are also being|were also}} expanded into the annex.<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ />

The Jones’s annex {{show by date|2022|||will contain|contains}} a [[superstructure]] of concrete and {{show by date|2022|||will cover|covers}} {{Convert|20000|ft2}}.<ref>{{cite web |date=April 7, 2021 |title=Cort Theatre |url=https://www.jrmcm.com/project/cort-theatre/ |access-date=November 12, 2021 |website=JRMCM |archive-date=November 12, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211112142955/https://www.jrmcm.com/project/cort-theatre/ |url-status=live}}</ref> The annex {{show by date|2022|||will have|has}} accessible bathrooms, concession areas, lounge, dressing rooms, and rehearsal space. A grand staircase {{show by date|2022|||will connect|connects}} the lounges on three stories of the annex, with views of 48th Street. An elevator is being placed in the annex to allow wheelchair access into the auditorium’s balconies.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /> The annex {{show by date|2022|||will be|is}} connected to the existing theater via new door openings.<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ /><ref>{{harvnb|AKRF Inc.|2020|p=72|ps=.}}</ref> With the construction of the annex, the [[Wing (theater)|]] also expanded into the annex.<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ />

==History==

==History==

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Early in the 2010s, the theater hosted ”[[Fences (play)|Fences]]” and ”[[Time Stands Still (play)|Time Stands Still]]” in 2010; ”[[Born Yesterday (play)|Born Yesterday]]” and ”[[Stick Fly]]” in 2011; and ”[[The Lyons]]” and ”[[Grace (play)|Grace]]” in 2012.<ref name=”Playbill Cort” /><ref name=”:0″ /> ”Fences” set the box office record for the theater, grossing $1,175,626 over eight performances for the week ending July 11, 2010.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Rabinowitz |first=Chloe |title=Theater Stories: Learn About the Box Office Record-Breaking Production of FENCES, THE MINUTES & More About The Cort Theatre |url=https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Theater-Stories-Learn-About-the-Box-Office-Record-Breaking-Production-of-FENCES-THE-MINUTES-More-About-The-Cort-Theatre-20201122 |access-date=2021-11-13 |website=Broadway World |language=en |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030830/https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Theater-Stories-Learn-About-the-Box-Office-Record-Breaking-Production-of-FENCES-THE-MINUTES-More-About-The-Cort-Theatre-20201122 |url-status=live}}</ref> The Cort hosted ”[[Breakfast at Tiffany’s (novella)|Breakfast at Tiffany’s]]” in 2013,<ref name=”Playbill-0000013993″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Tiffany’s’ |first=”Breakfast at |date=2013-03-20 |title=Video: Excerpt: “Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/video/theater/100000002128142/excerpt-breakfast-at-tiffanys.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032354/https://www.nytimes.com/video/theater/100000002128142/excerpt-breakfast-at-tiffanys.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[No Man’s Land (play)|No Man’s Land]]” and ”[[Waiting for Godot]]” played in repertory the same year.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2013-09-05 |title=Scene Partners Step Into the Void |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/theater/scene-partners-step-into-the-void.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030831/https://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/theater/scene-partners-step-into-the-void.html |url-status=live}}</ref> Subsequently, ”[[The Cripple of Inishmaan]]”<ref name=”Playbill-0000014054″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2014-04-21 |title=Hope Is Hollywood, Out of the Blue |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/theater/daniel-radcliffe-stars-in-revival-of-the-cripple-of-inishmaan.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032343/https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/theater/daniel-radcliffe-stars-in-revival-of-the-cripple-of-inishmaan.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[This is Our Youth]]” played at the Cort in 2014,<ref name=”Playbill-0000014059″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Itzkoff |first=Dave |date=2014-08-20 |title=These Kids Today |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/theater/three-young-actors-bring-this-is-our-youth-to-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030837/https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/theater/three-young-actors-bring-this-is-our-youth-to-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> while ”[[Fish in the Dark]]”<ref name=”Playbill-0000014078″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2015-03-06 |title=Review: ‘Fish in the Dark,’ Larry David’s Antic Broadway Debut |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/06/theater/review-fish-in-the-dark-larry-davids-antic-broadway-debut.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030843/https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/06/theater/review-fish-in-the-dark-larry-davids-antic-broadway-debut.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[Sylvia (play)|Sylvia]]” played in 2015.<ref name=”Playbill-0000014131″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Piepenburg |first=Erik |date=2015-11-02 |title=In Performance: Matthew Broderick and Annaleigh Ashford of ‘Sylvia’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/03/theater/in-performance-matthew-broderick-and-annaleigh-ashford-of-sylvia.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032346/https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/03/theater/in-performance-matthew-broderick-and-annaleigh-ashford-of-sylvia.html |url-status=live}}</ref> The Shuberts acquired an adjacent garage to the west and demolished it in 2016.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /> The Cort then hosted the production of ”[[Bright Star (musical)|Bright Star]]” that year.<ref name=”Playbill-0000014147″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Isherwood |first=Charles |date=2016-03-25 |title=Review: ‘Bright Star’ Beams Nostalgia Underscored by Fiddles and Banjos |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/25/theater/review-bright-star-beams-nostalgia-underscored-by-fiddles-and-banjos.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030850/https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/25/theater/review-bright-star-beams-nostalgia-underscored-by-fiddles-and-banjos.html |url-status=live}}</ref> In 2017, the Shuberts received permission from the LPC to construct a 35-foot-wide annex west of the existing theater, designed by Kostow Greenwood Architects. Francesca Russo would also design a renovation of the existing theater.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /><ref>{{cite web |last=Rosenberg |first=Zoe |date=November 28, 2017 |title=Thomas Lamb’s Cort Theatre will join 21st century with new annex |url=https://ny.curbed.com/2017/11/28/16711664/cort-theatre-broadway-thomas-lamb-architecture |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Curbed NY |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193222/https://ny.curbed.com/2017/11/28/16711664/cort-theatre-broadway-thomas-lamb-architecture |url-status=live}}</ref> The Shuberts also received permission to transfer {{Convert|119,268|ft2}} of air development rights to a 49-story hotel adjoining the theater;<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ /> the air rights sale was valued at $50 million.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Maurer |first=Mark |date=2017-11-08 |title=Tribeach seeking 120K sf of Cort Theatre air rights for new Riu hotel |url=https://therealdeal.com/2017/11/08/tribeach-seeking-120k-sf-of-cort-theatre-air-rights-for-new-riu-hotel/ |url-status=live |access-date=2021-11-13 |website=The Real Deal New York |language=en-US |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030838/https://therealdeal.com/2017/11/08/tribeach-seeking-120k-sf-of-cort-theatre-air-rights-for-new-riu-hotel/}}</ref> The Cort additionally showed two productions in 2017: ”[[Paula Vogel|Indecent]]”<ref name=”Playbill 2017-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2017-04-19 |title=Review: ‘Indecent’ Pays Heartfelt Tribute to a Stage Scandal |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/theater/indecent-review-paula-vogel-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030834/https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/theater/indecent-review-paula-vogel-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[M. Butterfly]]”.<ref name=”Playbill 2017-2″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Chow |first=Andrew R. |date=2017-12-12 |title=‘M. Butterfly’ Will Close This Sunday on Broadway |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/theater/m-butterfly-will-close-this-sunday-on-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032353/https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/theater/m-butterfly-will-close-this-sunday-on-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> [[Mike Birbiglia]] performed his one-man comedy ”The New One” in 2018,<ref name=”Playbill 2018-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2018-11-12 |title=Review: Mike Birbiglia Is a Very Nervous Dad in ‘The New One’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/11/theater/the-new-one-review-mike-birbiglia.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030847/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/11/theater/the-new-one-review-mike-birbiglia.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and the productions of ”[[King Lear]]”<ref name=”Playbill 2019-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=2019-06-03 |title=‘King Lear’ Revival Will Close Early on Broadway |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/03/theater/king-lear-revival-broadway-closing.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032341/https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/03/theater/king-lear-revival-broadway-closing.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and [[Derren Brown]]’s one-man show ”Secret” were housed at the Cort in 2019.<ref name=”Playbill 2019-2″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2019-09-16 |title=Review: Being Brainwashed Into Joy in Derren Brown’s ‘Secret’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/15/theater/derren-brown-secret-review.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030838/https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/15/theater/derren-brown-secret-review.html |url-status=live}}</ref>

Early in the 2010s, the theater hosted ”[[Fences (play)|Fences]]” and ”[[Time Stands Still (play)|Time Stands Still]]” in 2010; ”[[Born Yesterday (play)|Born Yesterday]]” and ”[[Stick Fly]]” in 2011; and ”[[The Lyons]]” and ”[[Grace (play)|Grace]]” in 2012.<ref name=”Playbill Cort” /><ref name=”:0″ /> ”Fences” set the box office record for the theater, grossing $1,175,626 over eight performances for the week ending July 11, 2010.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Rabinowitz |first=Chloe |title=Theater Stories: Learn About the Box Office Record-Breaking Production of FENCES, THE MINUTES & More About The Cort Theatre |url=https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Theater-Stories-Learn-About-the-Box-Office-Record-Breaking-Production-of-FENCES-THE-MINUTES-More-About-The-Cort-Theatre-20201122 |access-date=2021-11-13 |website=Broadway World |language=en |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030830/https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Theater-Stories-Learn-About-the-Box-Office-Record-Breaking-Production-of-FENCES-THE-MINUTES-More-About-The-Cort-Theatre-20201122 |url-status=live}}</ref> The Cort hosted ”[[Breakfast at Tiffany’s (novella)|Breakfast at Tiffany’s]]” in 2013,<ref name=”Playbill-0000013993″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Tiffany’s’ |first=”Breakfast at |date=2013-03-20 |title=Video: Excerpt: “Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/video/theater/100000002128142/excerpt-breakfast-at-tiffanys.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032354/https://www.nytimes.com/video/theater/100000002128142/excerpt-breakfast-at-tiffanys.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[No Man’s Land (play)|No Man’s Land]]” and ”[[Waiting for Godot]]” played in repertory the same year.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2013-09-05 |title=Scene Partners Step Into the Void |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/theater/scene-partners-step-into-the-void.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030831/https://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/theater/scene-partners-step-into-the-void.html |url-status=live}}</ref> Subsequently, ”[[The Cripple of Inishmaan]]”<ref name=”Playbill-0000014054″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2014-04-21 |title=Hope Is Hollywood, Out of the Blue |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/theater/daniel-radcliffe-stars-in-revival-of-the-cripple-of-inishmaan.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032343/https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/theater/daniel-radcliffe-stars-in-revival-of-the-cripple-of-inishmaan.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[This is Our Youth]]” played at the Cort in 2014,<ref name=”Playbill-0000014059″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Itzkoff |first=Dave |date=2014-08-20 |title=These Kids Today |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/theater/three-young-actors-bring-this-is-our-youth-to-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030837/https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/theater/three-young-actors-bring-this-is-our-youth-to-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> while ”[[Fish in the Dark]]”<ref name=”Playbill-0000014078″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2015-03-06 |title=Review: ‘Fish in the Dark,’ Larry David’s Antic Broadway Debut |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/06/theater/review-fish-in-the-dark-larry-davids-antic-broadway-debut.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030843/https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/06/theater/review-fish-in-the-dark-larry-davids-antic-broadway-debut.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[Sylvia (play)|Sylvia]]” played in 2015.<ref name=”Playbill-0000014131″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Piepenburg |first=Erik |date=2015-11-02 |title=In Performance: Matthew Broderick and Annaleigh Ashford of ‘Sylvia’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/03/theater/in-performance-matthew-broderick-and-annaleigh-ashford-of-sylvia.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032346/https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/03/theater/in-performance-matthew-broderick-and-annaleigh-ashford-of-sylvia.html |url-status=live}}</ref> The Shuberts acquired an adjacent garage to the west and demolished it in 2016.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /> The Cort then hosted the production of ”[[Bright Star (musical)|Bright Star]]” that year.<ref name=”Playbill-0000014147″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Isherwood |first=Charles |date=2016-03-25 |title=Review: ‘Bright Star’ Beams Nostalgia Underscored by Fiddles and Banjos |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/25/theater/review-bright-star-beams-nostalgia-underscored-by-fiddles-and-banjos.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030850/https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/25/theater/review-bright-star-beams-nostalgia-underscored-by-fiddles-and-banjos.html |url-status=live}}</ref> In 2017, the Shuberts received permission from the LPC to construct a 35-foot-wide annex west of the existing theater, designed by Kostow Greenwood Architects. Francesca Russo would also design a renovation of the existing theater.<ref name=”New York YIMBY 2017″ /><ref>{{cite web |last=Rosenberg |first=Zoe |date=November 28, 2017 |title=Thomas Lamb’s Cort Theatre will join 21st century with new annex |url=https://ny.curbed.com/2017/11/28/16711664/cort-theatre-broadway-thomas-lamb-architecture |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Curbed NY |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193222/https://ny.curbed.com/2017/11/28/16711664/cort-theatre-broadway-thomas-lamb-architecture |url-status=live}}</ref> The Shuberts also received permission to transfer {{Convert|119,268|ft2}} of air development rights to a 49-story hotel adjoining the theater;<ref name=”Broadway News 2021″ /> the air rights sale was valued at $50 million.<ref>{{Cite web |last=Maurer |first=Mark |date=2017-11-08 |title=Tribeach seeking 120K sf of Cort Theatre air rights for new Riu hotel |url=https://therealdeal.com/2017/11/08/tribeach-seeking-120k-sf-of-cort-theatre-air-rights-for-new-riu-hotel/ |url-status=live |access-date=2021-11-13 |website=The Real Deal New York |language=en-US |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030838/https://therealdeal.com/2017/11/08/tribeach-seeking-120k-sf-of-cort-theatre-air-rights-for-new-riu-hotel/}}</ref> The Cort additionally showed two productions in 2017: ”[[Paula Vogel|Indecent]]”<ref name=”Playbill 2017-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2017-04-19 |title=Review: ‘Indecent’ Pays Heartfelt Tribute to a Stage Scandal |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/theater/indecent-review-paula-vogel-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030834/https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/theater/indecent-review-paula-vogel-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and ”[[M. Butterfly]]”.<ref name=”Playbill 2017-2″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Chow |first=Andrew R. |date=2017-12-12 |title=‘M. Butterfly’ Will Close This Sunday on Broadway |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/theater/m-butterfly-will-close-this-sunday-on-broadway.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032353/https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/theater/m-butterfly-will-close-this-sunday-on-broadway.html |url-status=live}}</ref> [[Mike Birbiglia]] performed his one-man comedy ”The New One” in 2018,<ref name=”Playbill 2018-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2018-11-12 |title=Review: Mike Birbiglia Is a Very Nervous Dad in ‘The New One’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/11/theater/the-new-one-review-mike-birbiglia.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030847/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/11/theater/the-new-one-review-mike-birbiglia.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and the productions of ”[[King Lear]]”<ref name=”Playbill 2019-1″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=2019-06-03 |title=‘King Lear’ Revival Will Close Early on Broadway |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/03/theater/king-lear-revival-broadway-closing.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113032341/https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/03/theater/king-lear-revival-broadway-closing.html |url-status=live}}</ref> and [[Derren Brown]]’s one-man show ”Secret” were housed at the Cort in 2019.<ref name=”Playbill 2019-2″ /><ref>{{Cite news |last=Brantley |first=Ben |date=2019-09-16 |title=Review: Being Brainwashed Into Joy in Derren Brown’s ‘Secret’ |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/15/theater/derren-brown-secret-review.html |access-date=2021-11-13 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=2021-11-13 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211113030838/https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/15/theater/derren-brown-secret-review.html |url-status=live}}</ref>

The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the [[COVID-19 pandemic in New York City|COVID-19 pandemic]].<ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=March 12, 2020 |title=Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/theater/coronavirus-broadway-shutdown.html |access-date=October 22, 2021 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=September 16, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210916114023/https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/theater/coronavirus-broadway-shutdown.html |url-status=live}}</ref> During the shutdown, in March 2021, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be refurbished and the annex would be built. The work was planned to be completed by 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″>{{cite web |title=The expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre is finally moving ahead |website=The Architect’s Newspaper |date=March 4, 2021 |url=https://www.archpaper.com/2021/03/expansion-broadway-cort-theatre-moving-ahead/ | access-date=November 2, 2021 | archive-date=March 4, 2021 | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210304170854/https://www.archpaper.com/2021/03/expansion-broadway-cort-theatre-moving-ahead/ | url-status=live}}</ref><ref name=”Broadway News 2021″>{{cite web |date=February 1, 2021 |title=Shubert Organization to begin expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre |url=https://broadwaynews.com/2021/03/01/shubert-organization-to-begin-expansion-of-broadways-cort-theatre/ |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Broadway News |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193230/https://broadwaynews.com/2021/03/01/shubert-organization-to-begin-expansion-of-broadways-cort-theatre/ |url-status=live}}</ref> ”[[The Minutes (play)|The Minutes]]”, which had only played [[Preview (theatre)|previews]] at the Cort before the shutdown,<ref name=”Playbill 2020″ /> relocated as a result of the renovation.<ref>{{cite web |date=November 16, 2020 |title=”The Minutes” to vacate Broadway theater to allow for renovations, return planned for 2022 |url=https://broadwaynews.com/2020/11/16/the-minutes-to-vacate-broadway-theater-to-allow-for-renovations-return-planned-for-2022/ |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Broadway News |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193254/https://broadwaynews.com/2020/11/16/the-minutes-to-vacate-broadway-theater-to-allow-for-renovations-return-planned-for-2022/ |url-status=live}}</ref> During the COVID-19 shutdown, the Shuberts, Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn had pledged to increase racial and cultural diversity in their theaters, including naming at least one theater for a Black theatrical personality.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Paulson|first=Michael|date=2021-08-23|title=Broadway Power Brokers Pledge Diversity Changes as Theaters Reopen|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/23/theater/broadway-diversity-pledge-reopening.html|access-date=2022-03-06|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Accordingly, in March 2022, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be renamed after actor [[James Earl Jones]] and would be rededicated upon its reopening in mid-2022.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=March 2, 2022 |title=Broadway’s Cort Theater Will Have a New Name: James Earl Jones |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/02/theater/cort-theater-james-earl-jones.html |access-date=March 2, 2022 |issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref name=”NBC News 2022″>{{cite web | title=James Earl Jones honored in renaming of historic N.Y. Broadway theater | website=NBC News | date=March 2, 2022 | url=https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/james-earl-jones-honored-renaming-historic-ny-broadway-theater-rcna18354 | access-date=March 3, 2022}}</ref> The Jones was the second Broadway theater to be named after a Black theatrical personality.<ref name=”CNBC 2022″>{{cite web | title=Broadway theater will be renamed after James Earl Jones | website=CNBC | date=March 2, 2022 | url=https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/02/broadway-theater-will-be-renamed-after-james-earl-jones.html | access-date=March 3, 2022}}</ref>{{efn|Jujamcyn renamed the [[August Wilson Theatre]] for playwright [[August Wilson]] in 2005, while the Nederlanders announced that they would rename the [[Brooks Atkinson Theatre]] for singer and actress [[Lena Horne]] later in 2022.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Paulson|first=Michael|date=2022-06-09|title=In a First for Broadway, a Theater Will Be Renamed for Lena Horne|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/09/theater/lena-horne-broadway.html|access-date=2022-06-10|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>}} In August 2022, it was announced that the Jones would reopen that November with previews of the play ”[[Ohio State Murders (play)|Ohio State Murders]]”.<ref name=”Gans 2022″>{{Cite news |last=Gans |first=Andrew |date=2022-08-08 |title=Adrienne Kennedy’s Ohio State Murders, Starring Audra McDonald, Will Play Broadway’s James Earl Jones Theatre |work=Playbill |url=https://playbill.com/article/adrienne-kennedys-ohio-state-murders-starring-audra-mcdonald-will-play-broadways-james-earl-jones-theatre |access-date=2022-08-08}}</ref> The unveiling of the marquee for the James Earl Jones Theatre will be revealed on September 12, 2022 following the building‘s $47 million restoration and expansion.<ref>{{cite web | last=Gans | first=Andrew | title=Broadway’s James Earl Jones Theatre Sets Date for Official Unveiling | website=Playbill | date=September 1, 2022 | url=https://playbill.com/article/broadways-james-earl-jones-theatre-sets-date-for-official-unveiling | access-date=September 2, 2022}}</ref>

The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the [[COVID-19 pandemic in New York City|COVID-19 pandemic]].<ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=March 12, 2020 |title=Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/theater/coronavirus-broadway-shutdown.html |access-date=October 22, 2021 |issn=0362-4331 |archive-date=September 16, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210916114023/https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/12/theater/coronavirus-broadway-shutdown.html |url-status=live}}</ref> During the shutdown, in March 2021, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be refurbished and the annex would be built. The work was planned to be completed by 2022.<ref name=”Culwell-Block 2021″ /><ref name=”The Architect’s Newspaper 2021″>{{cite web |title=The expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre is finally moving ahead |website=The Architect’s Newspaper |date=March 4, 2021 |url=https://www.archpaper.com/2021/03/expansion-broadway-cort-theatre-moving-ahead/ | access-date=November 2, 2021 | archive-date=March 4, 2021 | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210304170854/https://www.archpaper.com/2021/03/expansion-broadway-cort-theatre-moving-ahead/ | url-status=live}}</ref><ref name=”Broadway News 2021″>{{cite web |date=February 1, 2021 |title=Shubert Organization to begin expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre |url=https://broadwaynews.com/2021/03/01/shubert-organization-to-begin-expansion-of-broadways-cort-theatre/ |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Broadway News |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193230/https://broadwaynews.com/2021/03/01/shubert-organization-to-begin-expansion-of-broadways-cort-theatre/ |url-status=live}}</ref> ”[[The Minutes (play)|The Minutes]]”, which had only played [[Preview (theatre)|previews]] at the Cort before the shutdown,<ref name=”Playbill 2020″ /> relocated as a result of the renovation.<ref>{{cite web |date=November 16, 2020 |title=”The Minutes” to vacate Broadway theater to allow for renovations, return planned for 2022 |url=https://broadwaynews.com/2020/11/16/the-minutes-to-vacate-broadway-theater-to-allow-for-renovations-return-planned-for-2022/ |access-date=November 11, 2021 |website=Broadway News |archive-date=November 11, 2021 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20211111193254/https://broadwaynews.com/2020/11/16/the-minutes-to-vacate-broadway-theater-to-allow-for-renovations-return-planned-for-2022/ |url-status=live}}</ref> During the COVID-19 shutdown, the Shuberts, Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn had pledged to increase racial and cultural diversity in their theaters, including naming at least one theater for a Black theatrical personality.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Paulson|first=Michael|date=2021-08-23|title=Broadway Power Brokers Pledge Diversity Changes as Theaters Reopen|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/23/theater/broadway-diversity-pledge-reopening.html|access-date=2022-03-06|issn=0362-4331}}</ref> Accordingly, in March 2022, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be renamed after actor [[James Earl Jones]] and would be rededicated upon its reopening in mid-2022.<ref>{{Cite news |last=Paulson |first=Michael |date=March 2, 2022 |title=Broadway’s Cort Theater Will Have a New Name: James Earl Jones |language=en-US |work=The New York Times |url=https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/02/theater/cort-theater-james-earl-jones.html |access-date=March 2, 2022 |issn=0362-4331}}</ref><ref name=”NBC News 2022″>{{cite web | title=James Earl Jones honored in renaming of historic N.Y. Broadway theater | website=NBC News | date=March 2, 2022 | url=https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/james-earl-jones-honored-renaming-historic-ny-broadway-theater-rcna18354 | access-date=March 3, 2022}}</ref> The Jones was the second Broadway theater to be named after a Black theatrical personality.<ref name=”CNBC 2022″>{{cite web | title=Broadway theater will be renamed after James Earl Jones | website=CNBC | date=March 2, 2022 | url=https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/02/broadway-theater-will-be-renamed-after-james-earl-jones.html | access-date=March 3, 2022}}</ref>{{efn|Jujamcyn renamed the [[August Wilson Theatre]] for playwright [[August Wilson]] in 2005, while the Nederlanders announced that they would rename the [[Brooks Atkinson Theatre]] for singer and actress [[Lena Horne]] later in 2022.<ref>{{Cite news|last=Paulson|first=Michael|date=2022-06-09|title=In a First for Broadway, a Theater Will Be Renamed for Lena Horne|language=en-US|work=The New York Times|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/09/theater/lena-horne-broadway.html|access-date=2022-06-10|issn=0362-4331}}</ref>}} In August 2022, it was announced that the Jones would reopen that November with previews of the play ”[[Ohio State Murders (play)|Ohio State Murders]]”.<ref name=”Gans 2022″>{{Cite news |last=Gans |first=Andrew |date=2022-08-08 |title=Adrienne Kennedy’s Ohio State Murders, Starring Audra McDonald, Will Play Broadway’s James Earl Jones Theatre |work=Playbill |url=https://playbill.com/article/adrienne-kennedys-ohio-state-murders-starring-audra-mcdonald-will-play-broadways-james-earl-jones-theatre |access-date=2022-08-08}}</ref> The James Earl Jones Theatre will be revealed on September 12, 2022 the ‘s $47 million restoration and expansion.<ref>{{cite web | last=Gans | first=Andrew | title=Broadway’s James Earl Jones Theatre Sets Date for Official Unveiling | website=Playbill | date=September 1, 2022 | url=https://playbill.com/article/broadways-james-earl-jones-theatre-sets-date-for-official-unveiling | access-date=September 2, 2022}}</ref>

== Notable productions ==

== Notable productions ==

Broadway theater in Manhattan, New York

The James Earl Jones Theatre, originally the Cort Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 138 West 48th Street, between Seventh Avenue and Sixth Avenue, in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. It was built in 1912 and designed by architect Thomas W. Lamb for impresario John Cort. An annex to the west of the theater, built between 2021 and 2022, was designed by Kostow Greenwood Architects. The Jones has 1,092 seats across three levels and is operated by the Shubert Organization. Both the facade and interior of the theater are New York City designated landmarks.

The theater maintains much of its original neoclassical design. Its 48th Street facade has a glass-and-metal marquee shielding the entrances, as well as a colonnade with an additional story above. The lobby has marble paneling and a coved ceiling. The auditorium contains a ground-level orchestra and two overhanging balconies with boxes. The auditorium’s proscenium arch is designed with “art glass” that can illuminate during performances, and its ceiling is coved. The western annex contains lounges, restrooms, and backstage areas.

John Cort received the rights to operate the theater in January 1912, and the Cort Theatre opened on December 20, 1912. Despite being regarded by the theatrical community as being on the “wrong side” of Broadway, the Cort hosted numerous hit productions during its early years. The Shubert Organization purchased the theater in 1927, two years before Cort’s death. Though the theater was used as a television studio for The Merv Griffin Show from 1969 to 1972, it has mostly remained in theatrical use through the years. The Cort temporarily closed in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic and was renovated during that time. In 2022, it was renamed after actor James Earl Jones, becoming the second Broadway venue to be named after a Black theatrical personality.

The James Earl Jones Theatre is a Broadway theater on 138 West 48th Street, on the south sidewalk between Seventh Avenue and Sixth Avenue (near Times Square), in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The rectangular land lot covers 12,010 square feet (1,116 m2), with a frontage of 120 feet (37 m) on 48th Street and a depth of 100.42 feet (31 m).[4] Nearby buildings include 1221 Avenue of the Americas to the northeast, 1211 Avenue of the Americas to the east, the Church of St. Mary the Virgin to the south, the Palace Theatre and TSX Broadway to the southwest, and 20 Times Square to the west.[4]

The James Earl Jones Theatre, designed by Thomas W. Lamb in the neoclassical style for impresario John Cort, was constructed in 1912.[5] The venue is one of Lamb’s few remaining theater buildings.[6] Although Edward B. Corey was frequently credited as the architect,[7][8] Lamb was the architect of record.[9] and William Crawford was the general contractor for the project.[10] An annex directly to the west is being designed by Kostow Greenwood Architects and is being built between 2021 and 2022.[11][12]

Facade[edit]

Original theater[edit]

Facade seen in March 2019, with the old marquee still in place

The main elevation of the Jones’s facade faces north on 48th Street and is made of marble,[13][8] with a layer of stone underlying it.[14] The original two-story theater facade is split into a central pavilion with a colonnade of three bays; the central colonnade is flanked by one additional bay to either side. The facade was modeled on the Petit Trianon, an 18th-century neoclassical chateau at Versailles.[15][16][17] A contemporary New-York Tribune article characterized the main facade elevation as being designed in the Louis XVI-era style.[13]

The central pavilion contains four fluted engaged columns with Corinthian-style capitals.[15][13] At ground level, each of the three center bays contains a set of double doors made of glass and aluminum, above which is a marquee.[15] The original marquee had three Art Nouveau arches,[14] but it was replaced in the 20th century with a boxy structure with signs on either side.[15] A new marquee, similar in design to the original, was installed in 2021;[11] it contains three arches framed by metal shield decorations, as well as four spherical lamps hanging from the marquee.[14] Above the marquee are arches topped by bracket-shaped keystones. A transom bar runs horizontally above the keystones, above which are slightly recessed pairs of windows, flanked by bellflowers.[15]

The outer bays have aluminum double doors with glass display boxes on either side. The doorways contain eared architraves and are topped by cornices. Above the cornices are round-arched panels, with keystones flanked by laurel leaves. The outer bays contain carved panels, rather than windows, on the upper story. The northwest and northeast corners of the theater’s facade are curved. Each end of the north elevation contains a Corinthian pilaster, and the northern ends of the west and east elevations also contain a pilaster.[18] An entablature runs above the upper story of the facade, wrapping around the curved corners to the northwest and northeast. Atop the central columns, the entablature has an inscription with the theater’s name.[18] A neon sign with the “Cort” name had been installed in front of the frieze in 1937;[19][20] it was removed during the 2021 renovation.[20] Above the entablature is a parapet with modillions and a blind balustrade.[19]

Annex[edit]

The theater under renovation in November 2021, with the annex being constructed at right

The western annex, measuring 35 feet (11 m) wide, is being built between 2021 and 2022.[11][12] The annex will be about 74 feet (23 m) tall, with five stories; the elevator shaft in the annex will rise to 80 feet (24 m). A recessed brown-granite bay at the end of the alley will connect the annex and original theater.[21] The annex’s elevator shaft will be about 30 feet above the roof of the original theater.[22] Unlike the original facade, it will have a modern design with cream-colored terracotta facade panels interspersed with polished brownstone pieces.[14][23] There will be glass display boxes at ground level, as well as a glazed window at the eastern corner of the annex’s upper stories.[24] There will also be an LED sign on the exterior of the annex’s upper stories.[22][25]

Interior[edit]

The Jones’s interior design is credited to Arthur Brunet, according to a promotional booklet from the theater’s opening. While the interior was not similar to that of the Petit Trianon, the design features are from the same era, the 17th century.[26] The interior color scheme was described in the booklet as having “a blending of old rose and gold” and plaster decoration “in complimentary [sic] colors of champagne and sienna”.[27]

Lobby[edit]

The entrance lobby is a rectangular space accessed from 48th Street.[28] The lobby is laid in white Pavanozza marble with plasterwork panels.[13][28]Tiffany Studios was credited with the design of the lobby.[13] The walls of the lobby contain a dado of Pavanozza marble, which surrounds the entire room. The north doors lead to the street, while three doors on the south wall connect to the auditorium. The south doors are surrounded by plaster frames, above which are entablatures and pediments with cartouches. There is a niche on the east wall, which contains a pedestal with a bust of Marie Antoinette. The west wall has box-office windows with marble frames.[28][29] The box office’s metalwork originally was made of bronze with gold and enamel reliefs.[13] The lobby has a coved ceiling with raised-plaster motifs and a central medallion with a chandelier made of bronze and crystal.[28] There is no accessible restroom in the original lobby.[30][31]

Auditorium[edit]

The auditorium has an orchestra level, two balconies, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The auditorium is square in layout and is designed with plaster decorations in high relief.[32] The Jones’s operator The Shubert Organization cites the auditorium as having 1,092 seats;[31] meanwhile, The Broadway League cites a figure of 1,084 seats[8][33] and Playbill gives a figure of 1,049.[30] These are divided into 502 seats in the orchestra, 264 on the first balcony, and 263 on the second balcony, as well as 24 box seats and 19 standing-only spots.[31] The Cort was originally a 999-seat venue when it opened in 1912.[13][34]

Seating areas[edit]

The rear (north) end of the orchestra contains a promenade, which has doorways with eared architraves on the rear wall, as well as plain doorways on the side walls. The orchestra has a raked floor and wainscoted walls, with paneling above the wainscoting.[32] Staircases with iron railings lead from the orchestra to the balconies.[35] The orchestra level is wheelchair-accessible via the main doors, but the balcony levels could only be accessed by steps prior to the annex’s construction.[31] The rears of the balconies have promenades with standing rails.[36] The balcony levels have doorways with eared architraves on the side walls. The second balcony’s walls are topped by friezes with swags and cameo panels. The balconies have floral moldings on the fronts of their undersides, with crystal light fixtures underneath. Air conditioning grilles are placed below the balconies.[35]

On either side of the stage is a wall section with two boxes each at the first and second balcony level.[32] Each wall section is flanked by Adam-style panels. The boxes themselves are curved and contain latticework and cameo decorations on the front railings. Under each box is a molding and a medallion holding a chandelier. Above each pair of second-balcony boxes, there is an eared architrave, as well as a latticework panel that depicts female figures flanking swags and a cartouche.[35] Originally, the auditorium had twelve boxes (four on each level),[13] but the boxes at orchestra level were removed.[32] Instead of an orchestra pit, there was a Wurlitzer organ that a single musician could operate.[13][8] The organ was an Opus 20 model with 13 manuals and three ranks.[37]

Other design features[edit]

The proscenium arch measures 29 feet 0 inches (8.84 m) high and 37 feet 5 inches (11.40 m) wide.[31] Itf consists of latticed plasterwork with art glass beneath it.[11][32] The art glass was capable of illumination,[13][8] but the illumination was then turned off until the theater was renovated in 2021.[11][12] The sides of the arch have swags and medallions. Above the center of the arch, and within the spandrels, there are depictions of putti and muses entangled in vines. There is a cornice with modillions and dentils above the arch.[32] The sounding board curves onto the ceiling above the proscenium arch and is divided into three sections.[36] The sounding board depicts a minuet that, according to the New-York Tribune, had been made “during the period made famous in [Antoine] Watteau’s drawings of French court life at Versailles”.[8][13] The depth of the auditorium to the proscenium is 28 feet 10 inches (8.79 m), while the depth to the front of the stage is 33 feet 5 inches (10.19 m).[31]

The ceiling is divided into three rectangular sections, which are recessed coves. The ribs of the ceiling, which separate the coves, are decorated with swags and wreaths. The center section contains a circular dome, which has a frieze extending outward, as well as an overhanging bronze and crystal chandelier at the center. Three additional panels, similar in design, hang over the second balcony.[36]

Annex[edit]

The Jones’s annex will contain a superstructure of concrete and will cover 20,000 square feet (1,900 m2).[38] The annex will have accessible bathrooms, concession areas, lounge, dressing rooms, and rehearsal space. A grand staircase will connect the lounges on three stories of the annex, with views of 48th Street. An elevator is being placed in the annex to allow wheelchair access into the auditorium’s balconies.[23] The annex will be connected to the existing theater via new door openings.[25][39] With the construction of the annex, the stage-left wing was also expanded into the annex.[25][40]

History[edit]

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[41] Manhattan’s theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[42][43] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Cort Theatre.[44] John Cort was a theatrical operator who had become highly successful on the West Coast of the United States, with 150 theaters at his peak, and came to New York City in 1905.[45][46] Cort had, in 1910, become president of the National Theatre Owners’ Association, a group of circuits that tried to break away from the New York-based syndicates like the Klaw and Erlanger circuit.[5][46] It was in this capacity that Cort decided to build new theaters in New York City.[5]

Cort operation[edit]

Development and early years[edit]

The Cort Theatre marquee prior to the 2021 renovation

Edward B. Corey acquired the lots on 138–146 West 48th Street and leased them to Cort for 21 years starting in January 1912.[47] Thomas Lamb was hired to design a theater there.[48][49] That March, Cort announced that he would erect two theaters in New York City: the Cort Theatre on 48th Street and the Illington Theatre on 46th Street.[50][51] The design of the Cort was so important that the specifications for the theater’s design were encoded in the lease agreement.[9] Namely, the design features could not be “inferior” to those in the now-demolished Playhouse Theatre across the street.[9] By that June, the production Peg o’ My Heart featuring Laurette Taylor had been scheduled for the Cort.[52][53] The opening of the theater was originally scheduled for November 1912.[16][17]

The Cort opened on December 20, 1912, with Peg o’ My Heart.[54][55] Theatrical critics of the time considered the Cort to be physically on the “wrong side” of Broadway; whereas most contemporary theaters were west of that street, the Cort was to the east.[56] Nonetheless, the theater was described in a contemporary media source as “one of the most exquisitely beautiful playhouses in Manhattan”.[9]Theatre magazine wrote of the Cort’s “sweeping, commanding lines, comfortable seats and admirable acoustic properties. If any exception is to be taken, it is that pink is too delicate a shade for such an expanse of decoration.”[57]

Peg o’ My Heart had over 600 performances,[58][59] a major accomplishment for the time, when 100 performances constituted a hit.[56] In 1913, Cort gave Oliver Morosco the exclusive rights to show plays at his namesake theater for five years.[60] After Peg o’ My Heart ended, the Mutual Film Corporation temporarily used the Cort as a cinema in mid-1914.[61] The venue then hosted two hit productions: Under Cover, which opened in 1914,[34][62] and The Princess Pat, which opened in 1915.[58][63] Due to the large number of early hits at the Cort, it was quickly perceived among the theatrical community as a “lucky” venue.[56]

Late 1910s and early 1920s[edit]

The theater presented John Cort’s productions, as well as those of other producers such as Morosco, the Shubert family, the Selwyn family, and Arthur Hammerstein, in its early years.[64]Molly O and Upstairs and Down,[65] as well as the hit The Yellow Jacket, performed at the Cort during 1916.[8][66] The following year, the venue hosted Mother Carey’s Chickens[65] and Flo-Flo,[58] the latter of which had 220 performances.[67] The Cort then hosted several of Shakespeare’s plays in early 1918.[68][69] The theater’s final hit of the 1910s was Abraham Lincoln,[34] which opened in 1919.[70] The Cort continued to host hits through the following decade.[71] These included Jim Jam Jems (1920),[72] with Joe E. Brown;[73]Captain Applejack (1921);[74]Merton of the Movies (1922);[75] and The Swan (1923),[76] with Basil Rathbone and Eva Le Gallienne.[77] Other events of the early 1920s included a seance performed by John Armstrong Chaloner in 1921,[78] as well as benefit performances such as Mu Lan (1921)[79] and Book of Job (1922).[80]

The theater had a series of short-lived productions in 1924.[77] More successful was the play The Second Mrs. Tanqueray (1924),[81] with Ethel Barrymore and Henry Daniell,[82] and the comedy White Collars (1925).[77][83] These were followed by another set of productions with short runs.[84] A dispute arose in October 1925 when three producers sued each other, alleging that Cort had granted each of them the right to use the theater during the same time period. Judge Thomas D. Thacher, of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, issued two injunctions: one granting production rights to Jane, Our Stranger,[85] and another that canceled that production after four performances.[86] Other hits of the mid-1920s included The Jazz Singer, which was transferred to the Cort in late 1925,[84][87] as well as The Little Spitfire, which opened in 1926.[88][89] The 1926 play Beyond Evil, which discussed interracial marriage, nearly prompted a riot when it was performed at the Cort.[90][91]

Shubert operation[edit]

1920s to 1960s[edit]

In May 1927, the Shubert Organization purchased the theater from Edward B. Corey, subject to a mortgage of $210,000.[92][93] The Shuberts took over the operation from Cort, who retired afterward.[94]Joseph Leblang and his representatives then operated the venue from August 1928 to December 1932.[30] The 1928 drama These Days, which had eight performances at the Cort, was Katharine Hepburn‘s first Broadway appearance.[95][96] Subsequently, the theater hosted A Most Immoral Lady in 1928 with Alice Brady, as well as Your Uncle Dudley in 1929 with Walter Connolly.[97] The Cort hosted Jed Harris‘s revival of the play Uncle Vanya in 1930,[98][99] along with the hit production Five Star Final the same year.[100][101] In addition to theatrical performances, the Cort hosted events like an opera in 1927[102] and a folk-song recital in 1930.[103]

Richard Aldrich and Alfred De Liagre made their production debut in 1933 with Three-Cornered Moon.[104] Two hits followed: The Green Bay Tree in 1933[98][105] and The Bishop Misbehaves in 1935.[106][107] Two plays by George Abbott took up the Cort during most of the next three years: Boy Meets Girl (1935)[98][108] and Room Service (1937),[98][109] both of which had hundreds of performances.[110] Several major productions followed, including The White Steed (1939),[111][112]The Male Animal (1940),[110][113]Charley’s Aunt (1940),[114][115]Cafe Crown (1942),[114][116]The Eve of St. Mark (1942),[117][118] and A Bell for Adano (1944).[110][119] During 1946, the Theatre Guild‘s Shakespearean Repertory Company appeared in The Winter’s Tale;[117][120]Katharine Cornell produced and starred in Antigone and Candida;[117][121] and Estelle Winwood and Cornelia Otis Skinner starred in Lady Windermere’s Fan.[122][123] This was followed in 1948 by the hits The Respectful Prostitute[124][125] and Two Blind Mice.[126][127] The 1949 production of The Father featured Grace Kelly‘s Broadway debut.[56]

Even in the 1950s, the Cort continued to present long-running productions.[128] The Theatre Guild returned in 1950,[106] presenting As You Like It.[110][129] This was followed by several hits such as Saint Joan (1951),[130][131]The Shrike (1952),[132][133]The Fifth Season (1953),[130][134] and The Rainmaker (1954).[135][136] Another major production was The Diary of Anne Frank, which opened in 1955 and played the Cort for over a year before relocating.[137][138] Another major productions of the late 1950s was The Rope Dancers in 1957.[139][140] The play Sunrise at Campobello opened in 1958 with Henry Jones, Mary Fickett, and Anne Seymour, as well as James Earl Jones in his Broadway debut;[141] it had well over 500 performances.[142][143]

The Cort hosted several productions in the early 1960s, including The Hostage and Advise and Consent in 1960,[144] as well as Purlie Victorious and Sunday in New York in 1961.[145] For the rest of the decade, the Cort had many productions, few of which were hits.[146] In May 1962, the Royal Dramatic Theatre of Sweden had a brief engagement with The Father, Long Day’s Journey into Night, and Miss Julie in repertory.[147][148] The next year saw a relatively unsuccessful adaptation of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; this was followed in 1965 by The Zulu and the Zayda.[147]

1970s to 1990s[edit]

CBS leased the theater as a television studio for The Merv Griffin Show, which started broadcasting there in August 1969.[90][149] The network spent $1 million on renovating the theater to convert it to a television studio.[149] By late 1970, Merv Griffin had moved his show to California. Griffin said he had been “ashamed” of leaving the Cort, since CBS had renovated it exclusively for his show, but the ratings for The Merv Griffin Show had increased following its relocation to California.[150] Meanwhile, CBS continued to lease the theater at a high price.[151] Two years into CBS’s lease, the construction of the neighboring 1211 Avenue of the Americas caused structural damage to the theater’s interior, and two girders were placed on the eastern wall. Because the interior was no longer suitable for television productions, CBS decided to let the lease lapse.[152] The CBS lease from 1969 to 1972 was the only period in which the Cort was used as a television studio rather than as a theater.[7]

The theater hosted the short-lived All the Girls Came Out to Play in 1972 and Jockey Club Stakes in 1973.[153]The Magic Show opened in 1974 and played 1,920 performances over the next five years.[154][155] The last production of that decade was King Richard III, which opened in 1979 and ran only 33 performances.[154][156] In 1980, the Cort hosted the flop Clothes for a Summer Hotel,[157][158] as well as the more successful Home the same year, with over 200 performances.[157][159] The Cort then hosted Rose in 1981;[160][161]Medea[162][163] and Twice Around the Park in 1982;[164][165] and A Moon for the Misbegotten[166][167] and Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom in 1984.[168][169] Theatrical historian Ken Bloom, observing several of the Cort’s short performances, said: “The Cort’s luck seems to have run out.”[56] The 1980s ended with the South African play Sarafina!, which played for over a year.[146][170] During the 1980s, the Shuberts renovated the Cort as part of a restoration program for their Broadway theaters.[171]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started considering protecting the Cort as an official city landmark in 1982,[172] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[173] The LPC designated both the facade and the interior as landmarks on November 17, 1987.[174] This was part of the LPC’s wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[175] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[176] The Shuberts, the Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Cort, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[177] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[178]

The Cort hosted the hit The Grapes of Wrath in 1990,[179][180] as well as Lincoln Center Theater‘s short-lived production of Two Shakespearean Actors in 1992.[181][182] This was followed in 1994 by Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992.[183] Lincoln Center Theater returned to the Cort in 1995 with its revival of The Heiress,[184][185] which ran for over 300 performances.[186][187] Lincoln Center Theater then booked two additional productions:[188]Sex and Longing in 1996[189][190] and An American Daughter in 1997.[191][192] At the end of the decade, productions at the Cort included Freak (1998),[193][194]The Blue Room (1998),[195][196] and Kat and the Kings (1999).[197][198]

2000s to present[edit]

No Man’s Land and Waiting for Godot

In 2000, the Cort hosted a short production of The Green Bird.[199][200] It then hosted Hollywood Arms in 2002,[201][202]A Year with Frog and Toad in 2003,[203][204] and Laugh Whore in 2004.[205][206] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2003, the Shuberts agreed to improve disabled access at their 16 landmarked Broadway theaters, including the Cort.[207][208] The theater’s other productions in the decade included On Golden Pond (2005), Barefoot in the Park and The Little Dog Laughed (2006), Radio Golf and The Homecoming (2007), The 39 Steps (2008), and You’re Welcome America: A Final Night with George W. Bush (2009).[30][33]

Early in the 2010s, the theater hosted Fences and Time Stands Still in 2010; Born Yesterday and Stick Fly in 2011; and The Lyons and Grace in 2012.[30][33]Fences set the box office record for the theater, grossing $1,175,626 over eight performances for the week ending July 11, 2010.[209] The Cort hosted Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 2013,[210][211] and No Man’s Land and Waiting for Godot played in repertory the same year.[212] Subsequently, The Cripple of Inishmaan[213][214] and This is Our Youth played at the Cort in 2014,[215][216] while Fish in the Dark[217][218] and Sylvia played in 2015.[219][220] The Shuberts acquired an adjacent garage to the west and demolished it in 2016.[23] The Cort then hosted the production of Bright Star that year.[221][222] In 2017, the Shuberts received permission from the LPC to construct a 35-foot-wide annex west of the existing theater, designed by Kostow Greenwood Architects. Francesca Russo would also design a renovation of the existing theater.[23][223] The Shuberts also received permission to transfer 119,268 square feet (11,080.4 m2) of air development rights to a 49-story hotel adjoining the theater;[25] the air rights sale was valued at $50 million.[224] The Cort additionally showed two productions in 2017: Indecent[225][226] and M. Butterfly.[227][228]Mike Birbiglia performed his one-man comedy The New One in 2018,[229][230] and the productions of King Lear[231][232] and Derren Brown‘s one-man show Secret were housed at the Cort in 2019.[233][234]

The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[235] During the shutdown, in March 2021, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be refurbished and the annex would be built. The work was planned to be completed by 2022.[11][12][25]The Minutes, which had only played previews at the Cort before the shutdown,[236] relocated as a result of the renovation.[237] During the COVID-19 shutdown, the Shuberts, Nederlanders, and Jujamcyn had pledged to increase racial and cultural diversity in their theaters, including naming at least one theater for a Black theatrical personality.[238] Accordingly, in March 2022, the Shuberts announced that the Cort would be renamed after actor James Earl Jones and would be rededicated upon its reopening in mid-2022.[239][240] The Jones was the second Broadway theater to be named after a Black theatrical personality.[241][a] In August 2022, it was announced that the Jones would reopen that November with previews of the play Ohio State Murders.[243] The James Earl Jones Theatre’s marquee will be revealed on September 12, 2022, to mark the completion of the theater’s $47 million restoration and expansion.[40][244]

Notable productions[edit]

1910s to 1990s[edit]

2000s to present[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jujamcyn renamed the August Wilson Theatre for playwright August Wilson in 2005, while the Nederlanders announced that they would rename the Brooks Atkinson Theatre for singer and actress Lena Horne later in 2022.[242]
  2. ^ The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden and The Respectful Prostitute were performed in repertory.[125]
  3. ^ The Father, Long Day’s Journey into Night, and Miss Julie were performed in repertory.[147]
  4. ^ Leda Had a Little Swan never officially opened at the Cort Theatre; it only played previews.[285]
  5. ^ Face Value never officially opened at the Cort Theatre; it only played previews.[289]
  6. ^ Bobbi Boland never officially opened at the Cort Theatre; it only played previews.[294]
  7. ^ No Man’s Land and Waiting for Godot were performed in repertory.[311]
  8. ^ Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, The Minutes never officially opened at the Cort Theatre; it only played previews.[236]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 298. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c “138 West 48 Street, 10036”. New York City Department of City Planning. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 8.
  6. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 10.
  7. ^ a b Bordman, G.M. (1987). The Concise Oxford Companion to American Theatre. Oxford University Press. p. 150. ISBN 978-0-19-516986-7. Archived from the original on November 16, 2021. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 57.
  9. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 12.
  10. ^ “Theatres”. The Real Estate Record: Real estate record and builders’ guide. Vol. 89, no. 2309. June 15, 1912. p. 1309. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 16, 2021 – via columbia.edu.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Culwell-Block, Logan (February 1, 2021). “Broadway’s Cort Theatre to Receive Major Renovation and Expansion”. Playbill. Archived from the original on November 3, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d “The expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre is finally moving ahead”. The Architect’s Newspaper. March 4, 2021. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k “Cort Theatre Open to-night: Laurette Taylor, in ” Peg O My Heart,” by J. Hartley Manners, Will Be First Attraction to Appear at New Playhouse”. New-York Tribune. December 20, 1912. p. 16. ProQuest 575011423.
  14. ^ a b c d AKRF Inc. 2020, p. 71.
  15. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  16. ^ a b “Cort Theatre to Open”. New-York Tribune. October 17, 1912. p. 9. ProQuest 574993633.
  17. ^ a b “The Amusement Week in New York: New Cort Theatre to Open Nov. 25”. The Billboard. Vol. 24, no. 46. October 26, 1912. p. 4. ProQuest 1031441478.
  18. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 15–16.
  19. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  20. ^ a b AKRF Inc. 2020, pp. 71–72.
  21. ^ AKRF Inc. 2020, p. 88.
  22. ^ a b AKRF Inc. 2020, p. 89.
  23. ^ a b c d Nelson, Andrew (November 28, 2017). “Renderings Revealed for Cort Theater Expansion at 138 West 48th Street, Times Square”. New York YIMBY. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  24. ^ AKRF Inc. 2020, pp. 88–89.
  25. ^ a b c d e “Shubert Organization to begin expansion of Broadway’s Cort Theatre”. Broadway News. February 1, 2021. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  26. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 14.
  27. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 13.
  28. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  29. ^ Diamonstein, Barbaralee (1998). Landmarks of New York III. Landmarks of New York Series. Harry N. Abrams. p. 313. ISBN 978-0-8109-3594-5. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d e “Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 14, 1993. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  31. ^ a b c d e f “Cort Theatre”. Shubert Organization. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  32. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  33. ^ a b c The Broadway League (December 20, 1912). “Cort Theatre – New York, NY”. IBDB. Archived from the original on June 5, 2020. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  34. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 57.
  35. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  36. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  37. ^ “Cort Theatre”. New York City Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. Archived from the original on October 15, 2018. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  38. ^ “Cort Theatre”. JRMCM. April 7, 2021. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  39. ^ AKRF Inc. 2020, p. 72.
  40. ^ a b Evans, Greg (September 1, 2022). “James Earl Jones Theatre Gets Official Broadway Opening: Renaming & Dedication Ceremony Announced”. Deadline. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  41. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). “The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater”. New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  42. ^ “Theater District –”. New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  43. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  44. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  45. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 57; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 7.
  46. ^ a b “John Cort Dies at 69 After a Break Down; Noted Theatre Manager and Producer Succumbs in Sanitarium in Stamford, Conn”. The New York Times. November 19, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  47. ^ “The Real Estate Field; Big Commercial Loft Planned for Murray Hill Section”. The New York Times. January 23, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  48. ^ “The Real Estate Field; Big Commercial Loft Planned for Murray Hill Section – to Decide Fate of Madison Square Garden to-day – Big Harlem Deal Pending – George W. Young Leases His Deal Estate”. The New York Times. January 23, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
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  50. ^ “Two New Theatres”. The Sun. March 7, 1912. p. 9. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  51. ^ “Flakes of Pink Snow”. New-York Tribune. March 7, 1912. p. 8. ProQuest 574892950.
  52. ^ “The Amusement Week in New York: John Cort Announces Plans”. The Billboard. Vol. 24, no. 25. June 22, 1912. pp. 4, 53. ProQuest 1040287333.
  53. ^ “Cort Announces Plans: Theatrical Manager Promises at Least 5 Important Productions”. New-York Tribune. June 13, 1912. p. 9. ProQuest 574938745.
  54. ^ ‘Peg O’ My Heart’: Cort Theatre Opens With Hartley Manners Comedy”. New-York Tribune. December 21, 1912. p. 9. ProQuest 575017042.
  55. ^ “Peg O’ My Heart’ Charms at Cort; Propitious Opening of a New Theatre with Fascinating Playing by Laurette Taylor”. The New York Times. December 21, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
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  57. ^ Thorold, W.J.; Hornblow, A.; Maxwell, P.; Beach, S. (1913). The New Plays. Theatre Magazine. Theatre Magazine Company. p. 36. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
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  59. ^ “End of ‘Peg’s’ Remarkable Run”. The New York Times. May 24, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  60. ^ “Cort Theater for Morosco Plays”. The Billboard. Vol. 25, no. 41. October 11, 1913. p. 58. ProQuest 1031456203.
  61. ^ “Mutual Takes Cort”. Variety. Vol. 34, no. 10. May 8, 1914. p. 18. ProQuest 1529275654.
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  63. ^ a b “The Princess Pat Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 12, 1916. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (September 29, 1915). “The Princess Pat – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  64. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 13–14.
  65. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  66. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  67. ^ “Flo-flo Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 29, 1918. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (December 20, 1917). “Flo-Flo – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  68. ^ “Up and Down Broadway”. The New York Times. March 3, 1918. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  69. ^ “Hampden Acts Hamlet; Beatrice Terry the Ophelia of Shakespeare Playhouse Production”. The New York Times. April 13, 1918. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  70. ^ a b “Abraham Lincoln Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 21, 1929. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (December 15, 1919). “Abraham Lincoln – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  71. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 57–58; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 13–14.
  72. ^ “Jim Jam Jems Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 1, 1920. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (October 4, 1920). “Jim Jam Jems – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  73. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 57; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  74. ^ a b “Captain Applejack Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 11, 1922. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (December 30, 1921). “Captain Applejack – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  75. ^ a b “Merton of the Movies Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 20, 1923. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 13, 1922). “Merton of the Movies – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  76. ^ “The Swan Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 15, 1924. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (October 23, 1923). “The Swan – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  77. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 58; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  78. ^ “P.T. Barnum’s Spirit Talks to Chaloner; Says at Cort Theatre That Christ Is Coming Soon With 600,000 Bullet-proof Soldiers”. The New York Times. February 28, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  79. ^ “Chinese Students Act Play for Famine Fund; Excel in an English Dramatization of ‘Mu Lan,’ a Poem of the Sixth Century”. The New York Times. February 25, 1921. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  80. ^ “The Book of Job” at Cort Theatre”. The New York Times. October 25, 1922. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  81. ^ a b “The Second Mrs. Tanqueray Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 10, 1924. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 27, 1924). “The Second Mrs. Tanqueray – Broadway Play – 1924 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  82. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  83. ^ “White Collars Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 9, 1925. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (February 23, 1925). “White Collars – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  84. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 58–59.
  85. ^ “Producer Wins Use of Cort Theatre; Court Settles Triangular Dispute by Granting Temporary Injunction to Gulesian”. The New York Times. October 7, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  86. ^ ‘Jane—Our Stranger’ Ousted From Cort Theater by Judge”. The Billboard. Vol. 37, no. 42. October 17, 1925. p. 9. ProQuest 1031778670.
  87. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 14, 1925). “The Jazz Singer – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on May 25, 2006. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  88. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  89. ^ “The Little Spitfire Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 6, 1926. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (August 16, 1926). “The Little Spitfire – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  90. ^ a b ‘The Cort’ Rich in Memories”. The Atlanta Constitution. August 16, 1969. p. 19T. ProQuest 1613582475 – via newspapers.com.
  91. ^ ‘Beyond Evil’ Greeted With Lusty Boos; Poet Thorne’s Disjointed Play Dealing With Miscegenation Runs Gauntlet of Ridicule at the Cort”. The New York Times. June 8, 1926. ISSN 0362-4331.
  92. ^ “Shuberts Buy Cort Theater On West 48th Street”. New York Herald Tribune. May 6, 1927. p. 33. ProQuest 1113529217.
  93. ^ “Title to Cort Theatre Passes”. The New York Times. May 6, 1927. p. 41. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 103982996.
  94. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  95. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59.
  96. ^ Samelson, Judy (July 6, 2009). “Katharine Hepburn On Stage”. Playbill. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  97. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  98. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  99. ^ a b “Uncle Vanya Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 15, 1930. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (April 15, 1930). “Uncle Vanya – Broadway Play – 1930 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  100. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  101. ^ a b “Five Star Final Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 1, 1931. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (December 30, 1930). “Five Star Final – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  102. ^ “Opera Season to Open Monday at Cort Theater”. New York Herald Tribune. May 29, 1927. p. E5. ProQuest 1131201122.
  103. ^ “Baritone in Folk Songs; Chaim Kotylansky Gives an Interesting Recital at Cort Theatre”. The New York Times. November 10, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  104. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59.
  105. ^ a b “The Green Bay Tree Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 1, 1951. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 20, 1933). “The Green Bay Tree – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  106. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  107. ^ a b “The Bishop Misbehaves Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 7, 1934. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 20, 1935). “The Bishop Misbehaves – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 4, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  108. ^ “Boy Meets Girl Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 22, 1943. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (November 27, 1935). “Boy Meets Girl – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  109. ^ a b “Room Service Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 6, 1953. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (May 19, 1937). “Room Service – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  110. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  111. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  112. ^ a b “The White Steed Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 27, 1939. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 10, 1939). “The White Steed – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  113. ^ a b “The Male Animal Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 29, 1940. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 9, 1940). “The Male Animal – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  114. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 59; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  115. ^ a b “Charley’s Aunt Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 27, 1941. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 17, 1940). “Charley’s Aunt – Broadway Play – 1940 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  116. ^ a b “Cafe Crown Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 1, 1942. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 23, 1942). “Cafe Crown – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  117. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  118. ^ “The Eve of St. Mark Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 18, 1942. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (October 7, 1942). “The Eve of St. Mark – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  119. ^ “A Bell for Adano Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 21, 1945. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (December 6, 1944). “A Bell for Adano – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  120. ^ a b “The Winter’s Tale Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 15, 1946. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 15, 1946). “The Winter’s Tale – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  121. ^ “News of the Stage; Two Katharine Cornell Plays, ‘Antigone’ and ‘Candida,’ Will Leave Cort Theatre on May 4 –Slated to Move to Chicago”. The New York Times. April 16, 1946. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  122. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  123. ^ a b “Lady Windermere’s Fan Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 25, 1946. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 14, 1946). “Lady Windermere’s Fan – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  124. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  125. ^ a b c “The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden and the Respectful Prostitute Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 18, 1948. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (March 16, 1948). “The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden and The Respectful Prostitute – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  126. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  127. ^ a b “Two Blind Mice Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 2, 1949. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (March 2, 1949). “Two Blind Mice – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  128. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60.
  129. ^ a b “As You Like It Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 30, 1950. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 26, 1950). “As You Like It – Broadway Play – 1950 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  130. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 60; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  131. ^ a b “Saint Joan Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 7, 1952. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 4, 1951). “Saint Joan – Broadway Play – 1951 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  132. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  133. ^ a b “The Shrike Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 15, 1952. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 15, 1952). “The Shrike – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  134. ^ “The Fifth Season Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 16, 1953. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (January 23, 1953). “The Fifth Season – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  135. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 60–61; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  136. ^ a b “The Rainmaker Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 28, 1954. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 28, 1954). “The Rainmaker – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  137. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 61; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  138. ^ a b “The Diary of Anne Frank Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 26, 1957. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 5, 1955). “The Diary of Anne Frank – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  139. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 61; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  140. ^ “The Rope Dancers Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. August 1, 1957. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (November 20, 1957). “The Rope Dancers – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  141. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 31, 1958). “The Theatre: ‘Sunrise at Campobello’; Bellamy as Roosevelt Scores at the Cort”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 3, 2022.
  142. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. –58; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  143. ^ a b “Sunrise at Campobello Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 30, 1958. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 30, 1958). “Sunrise at Campobello – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on April 27, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  144. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  145. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  146. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62.
  147. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 34.
  148. ^ Gelb, Arthur (May 16, 1962). “Theatre: O’Neill Tragedy; Swedish Actors Give Play Its Full Value The Cast”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  149. ^ a b Gardella, Kay (August 17, 1969). “Late-night Talk Battle Begins”. New York Daily News. p. 204. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  150. ^ “Merv Griffin Happier In Calif”. The Times Record. November 21, 1970. p. 26. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  151. ^ Adams, Val (August 28, 1970). “CBS Negotiating for ‘Ben-Hur’. New York Daily News. p. 51. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  152. ^ “Legitimate: Hold Confabs On Wall Damage To Cort Theatre, N.Y.”. Variety. Vol. 263, no. 9. July 14, 1971. p. 55. ProQuest 1017176610.
  153. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  154. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  155. ^ a b “The Magic Show Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 31, 1978. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (May 28, 1974). “The Magic Show – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  156. ^ a b “Richard III Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (June 14, 1979). “King Richard III – Broadway Play – 1979 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  157. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 36.
  158. ^ a b “Clothes for a Summer Hotel Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 3, 1979. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (March 26, 1980). “Clothes for a Summer Hotel – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  159. ^ “Home Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 3, 1979. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.The Broadway League (May 7, 1980). “Home – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  160. ^ “Rose Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 8, 1980. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.The Broadway League (March 26, 1981). “Rose – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  161. ^ ‘Rose,’ With Miss Jackson, Will End Its Run Tonight”. The New York Times. May 23, 1981. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  162. ^ a b “Medea Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 22, 1920. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (May 2, 1982). “Medea – Broadway Play – 1982 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  163. ^ Rich, Frank (May 3, 1982). “Theater: Zoe Caldwell Plays Medea”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  164. ^ “Twice Around the Park Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 6, 1982. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.The Broadway League (November 4, 1982). “Twice Around the Park – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  165. ^ Rich, Frank (November 5, 1982). “Theater: ‘Twice Around the Park’ by Schisgal”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  166. ^ a b “A Moon for the Misbegotten Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 2, 1957. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (April 1, 1984). “A Moon for the Misbegotten – Broadway Play – 1984 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  167. ^ Rich, Frank (May 2, 1984). “Theater: Kate Nelligan in ‘Moon for Misbegotten’. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  168. ^ a b “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 6, 2003. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.The Broadway League (October 11, 1984). “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  169. ^ ‘Ma Rainey’ to Close”. The New York Times. June 4, 1985. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  170. ^ a b “Sarafina! Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 1, 1987. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (January 28, 1988). “Sarafina! – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  171. ^ Bennetts, Leslie (April 22, 1986). “Theater Gets Raves for Decor”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  172. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). “Landmark Status Sought for Theaters”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  173. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). “Is the final curtain near?”. New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  174. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 18, 1987). “Plan Blocked for Tower Atop Landmark”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 8, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  175. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). “The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  176. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). “28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  177. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). “Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters’ Landmark Status”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  178. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). “High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  179. ^ a b “The Grapes of Wrath Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 2, 1990. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (March 22, 1990). “The Grapes of Wrath – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  180. ^ Witchel, Alex (July 2, 1990). ‘Grapes of Wrath’: Raves and a Tony Do Not Breed a Hit”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  181. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 62–63.
  182. ^ “Two Shakespearean Actors Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 9, 1992. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.The Broadway League (January 16, 1992). “Two Shakespearean Actors – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 8, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  184. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 63.
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  196. ^ “A ‘Blue Room’ Hiatus”. The New York Times. February 27, 1999. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  199. ^ ‘The Green Bird’ Is Closing”. The New York Times. June 1, 2000. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  206. ^ Isherwood, Charles (October 25, 2004). “The (Seething) Man Who Would Be Cher”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  207. ^ Tavernise, Sabrina (September 26, 2003). “Shuberts Revamp 16 Theaters, Improving Access for Disabled”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2022.
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  211. ^ Tiffany’s’, ‘Breakfast at (March 20, 2013). “Video: Excerpt: ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  212. ^ Brantley, Ben (September 5, 2013). “Scene Partners Step Into the Void”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  215. ^ a b “This Is Our Youth Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. August 18, 2014. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (September 11, 2014). “This Is Our Youth – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  216. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (August 20, 2014). “These Kids Today”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  217. ^ a b “Fish in the Dark Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 2, 2015. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (March 5, 2015). “Fish in the Dark – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
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  219. ^ a b “Sylvia Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 2, 2015. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (October 27, 2015). “Sylvia – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  220. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (November 2, 2015). “In Performance: Matthew Broderick and Annaleigh Ashford of ‘Sylvia’. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  222. ^ Isherwood, Charles (March 25, 2016). “Review: ‘Bright Star’ Beams Nostalgia Underscored by Fiddles and Banjos”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  223. ^ Rosenberg, Zoe (November 28, 2017). “Thomas Lamb’s Cort Theatre will join 21st century with new annex”. Curbed NY. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  224. ^ Maurer, Mark (November 8, 2017). “Tribeach seeking 120K sf of Cort Theatre air rights for new Riu hotel”. The Real Deal New York. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
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  227. ^ a b “M. Butterfly Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 7, 2017. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (October 26, 2017). “M. Butterfly – Broadway Play – 2017 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  228. ^ Chow, Andrew R. (December 12, 2017). ‘M. Butterfly’ Will Close This Sunday on Broadway”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  229. ^ a b “Mike Birbiglia’s The New One Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 25, 2018. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (November 11, 2018). “The New One – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  230. ^ Brantley, Ben (November 12, 2018). “Review: Mike Birbiglia Is a Very Nervous Dad in ‘The New One’. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  231. ^ a b “King Lear Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 28, 2019. Archived from the original on October 26, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (April 4, 2019). “King Lear – Broadway Play – 2019 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  232. ^ Paulson, Michael (June 3, 2019). ‘King Lear’ Revival Will Close Early on Broadway”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 13, 2021. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  233. ^ a b “Derren Brown: Secret Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 6, 2019. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (September 15, 2019). “Derren Brown: Secret – Broadway Special – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
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  235. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). “Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
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  237. ^ ‘The Minutes’ to vacate Broadway theater to allow for renovations, return planned for 2022″. Broadway News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
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  239. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 2, 2022). “Broadway’s Cort Theater Will Have a New Name: James Earl Jones”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  240. ^ “James Earl Jones honored in renaming of historic N.Y. Broadway theater”. NBC News. March 2, 2022. Retrieved March 3, 2022.
  241. ^ “Broadway theater will be renamed after James Earl Jones”. CNBC. March 2, 2022. Retrieved March 3, 2022.
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  245. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  246. ^ “Everyman Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 12, 1902. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 18, 1918). “Everyman – Broadway Play – 1918 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  247. ^ “The Merchant of Venice Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 25, 1903. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (January 25, 1918). “The Merchant of Venice – Broadway Play – 1918 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
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  249. ^ “Julius Caesar Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 1, 1902. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (March 15, 1918). “Julius Caesar – Broadway Play – 1918 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  250. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  251. ^ “The Better ‘ole, Broadway @ Greenwich Village Theatre”. Playbill. September 8, 1919. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 19, 1918). “The Better ‘Ole, – Broadway Special – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  252. ^ “The Assumption of Hannele Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 29, 1924. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 15, 1924). “The Assumption of Hannele – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  253. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  254. ^ “The Wrecker Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 5, 1928. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 27, 1928). “The Wrecker – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  255. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  256. ^ “The Blue Bird Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 1, 1932. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (April 21, 1932). “The Blue Bird – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  257. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  258. ^ “Most of the Game Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 1, 1935. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (September 1, 1935). “Most of the Game – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 12, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  259. ^ “There’s Wisdom in Women Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 7, 1935. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 30, 1935). “There’s Wisdom in Women – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  260. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  261. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  262. ^ “I Killed the Count Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. September 20, 1942. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (August 31, 1942). “I Killed the Count – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  263. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  264. ^ “Antigone Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. March 4, 1946. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 18, 1946). “Antigone – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  265. ^ “Candida Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 22, 1946. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (April 3, 1946). “Candida – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  266. ^ “Ghosts Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 16, 1948. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 16, 1948). “Ghosts – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  267. ^ “Hedda Gabler Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 5, 1903. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 24, 1948). “Hedda Gabler – Broadway Play – 1948 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  268. ^ “Make Way for Lucia Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 22, 1948. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (December 22, 1948). “Make Way for Lucia – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  269. ^ “The Father Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 11, 1928. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 16, 1949). “The Father – Broadway Play – 1949 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  270. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 33.
  271. ^ “Once Upon a Mattress Broadway @ Alvin Theatre”. Playbill. May 9, 1960. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (May 11, 1959). “Once Upon a Mattress – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  272. ^ “The Hostage Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 12, 1960. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (September 20, 1960). “The Hostage – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  273. ^ “Advise and Consent Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 20, 1961. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 17, 1960). “Advise and Consent – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  274. ^ “Purlie Victorious Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 20, 1961. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (September 28, 1961). “Purlie Victorious – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  275. ^ “Sunday in New York Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 11, 1961. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 29, 1961). “Sunday in New York – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  276. ^ “The Father Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. May 11, 1928. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (May 14, 1962). “The Father – Broadway Play – 1962 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  277. ^ “Long Day’s Journey Into Night Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 7, 1956. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (May 15, 1962). “Long Day’s Journey Into Night – Broadway Play – 1962 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  278. ^ “Countess Julia Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 28, 1913. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (May 16, 1962). “Miss Julie – Broadway Play – 1962 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  279. ^ “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 8, 2001. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 13, 1963). “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  280. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 35.
  281. ^ “Boeing-Boeing Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 19, 2008. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (February 2, 1965). “Boeing-Boeing – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  282. ^ “The Zulu and the Zayda Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 16, 1966. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 10, 1965). “The Zulu and the Zayda – Broadway Musical – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  283. ^ “Johnny No-Trump Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 8, 1967. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (October 8, 1967). “Johnny No-Trump – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  284. ^ “Something Different Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. February 24, 1968. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.The Broadway League (November 28, 1967). “Something Different – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  285. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 10, 1968). “Leda Had a Little Swan – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  286. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 37.
  287. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 54; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 62.
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  289. ^ Evans, Greg (March 15, 1993). “Hwang play falls on ‘Face’. Variety. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  290. ^ Bloom 2007, pp. 54–55; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 63.
  291. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 55; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 64.
  292. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 64.
  293. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 55.
  294. ^ a b “Bobbi Boland Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 24, 2003. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (November 9, 2003). “Bobbi Boland – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  295. ^ “On Golden Pond Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. June 26, 2005. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (April 7, 2005). “On Golden Pond – Broadway Play – 2005 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  296. ^ “Barefoot in the Park Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 24, 2006. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (February 16, 2006). “Barefoot in the Park – Broadway Play – 2006 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  297. ^ “The Little Dog Laughed Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. October 26, 2006. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (November 13, 2006). “The Little Dog Laughed – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  298. ^ “Radio Golf Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 20, 2007. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (May 8, 2007). “Radio Golf – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  299. ^ “The Homecoming Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. November 23, 2007. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (December 16, 2007). “The Homecoming – Broadway Play – 2007 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  300. ^ “The 39 Steps Broadway @ American Airlines Theatre”. Playbill. January 4, 2008. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (January 15, 2008). “The 39 Steps – Broadway Play – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  301. ^ “You’re Welcome America Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. January 20, 2009. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (February 5, 2009). “You’re Welcome America – Broadway Special – Original”. IBDB. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  302. ^ “A View from the Bridge Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. December 28, 2009. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (January 24, 2010). “A View From the Bridge – Broadway Play – 2010 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on June 29, 2019. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
  303. ^ “Fences Broadway @ Cort Theatre”. Playbill. April 14, 2010. Archived from the original on November 10, 2021. Retrieved November 10, 2021.The Broadway League (April 26, 2010). “Fences – Broadway Play – 2010 Revival”. IBDB. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved November 10, 2021.
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